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06/13/2010

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Hi Norris,

BS that Schumacher can't cut it. The car is not up to it even Rosberg is not setting the world on fire. Schumacher will come up with a winning car maybe not this year but next and I'll bet you $100.00 that he wins races if not this year next. At least today he raced like a real race driver ...no fear even banging wheels ...yet you Norris critizice him for that. Race drivers today are a bunch of godamn wimps! Period. I think even Brian Stewart would agree with me. The little boys racing cars today should have been around in the 60's and 70's when men were men and boys were boys...when it took guts to drive a race car... as Niki Lauda said a fews ago a monkey could drive a race car. I think he may be right. Then we have that idiot Brundle saying "naughty boy" about Schumacher...I didn't realise racing had gone pink!

Charlie Whiting has totally lost it:
He fines Hamilton 10 grand for stopping on the track after qualifying, but nothing for racing Alonso on pit lane!

Formula 1 rules will not make any sense until this guy is gone from his Race Director position!

Norris,
The Le Mans race is the last refuge for purist, who rather like to observe how things unfold, then to watch a contrived TV show that NASCAR and Formula 1 are becoming.
It was the best racing TV program last weekend because the hype and coverage did not want to be greater than the race itself.
Cudos for Speed Channel for showing a lot of it, and streaming it online when the TV was off!

Fascinating F1 race and I'm not ready to give up yet on Schumacher -- I wonder, though, how he'd do in NASCAR? Maybe he's one of the few open-wheel stars who could make a successful transition. He certainly has the instincts.

I'd like to see F1 cars start on rubber hard enough to last a full race and with enough fuel, too. Make pit stops a matter of last resort only, and concentrate on racing on the track.

Schumacher is a funny guy. He has said many time that he would never do ovals because of the risk. Last week he said he would not even do Le Mans again bacause of the risk (at night).
Yet, he has gone on to race motorcycles in the last couple of years, which is 100 times riskier than car racing. He even broke his neck doing it.

So who won the FF race in Montreal?

I guess when people get to a certain age (ie: a geezer over 50), its hard for them to stay up and watch a race. Le Mans is for those who get it.

Agreed Adam, Le Mans is "the race" of the year. Notice too, how the ACO even tried to sabotage the Audi Train by putting them a minute behind a secondary safety car early in the race for um...that other geezer, Nigel Mansell having a shunt in the guardrails. Guess Nigel wanted to hit the hay early.

Now a question for anyone out there who could answer this for me. Martin Brundle is a very good race commentator and of course his F1 knowledge is second to none but sometimes he shows bias and arrogance and/or portrays that F1 snottiness that drives me nuts. And sometimes, I'm not sure if he says things to stir it up or .....maybe even HE does not know what he's talking about. Then again, maybe he's way, way above us.

Here goes...the issue and the question.

Once in qualifying (on Saturday) and once early in the race on Sunday he referenced the track as largely being culprit for the tire wear as none of the F1 teams had not raced there in two years and the track had not seen any angry racing in that time, the issue being that the track was not rubbering in properly.

I have a very strong engineering background and even this perplexed me so if someone out there could explain it, I am all ears.

Why would it matter that F1 had not been there in two years? Even if they were there last year, surely the ‘rubber’ would be long gone with the four seasons of Montreal taking hold on that race surface.

Or am I wrong about that?

As well, the Nationwide series has been on Il Notre Dame the last two years so it’s not like the track did not see racing yet this was exactly what Brundle inferred and I found his phrasing very peculiar. Any explanations?

Attracting the Quebec Formula Ford drivers is obviously not a concern for the CAN AM race folks as they chose the same date as the Montreal GP! Brilliant!

David White wrote:
'Attracting the Quebec Formula Ford drivers is obviously not a concern for the CAN AM race folks as they chose the same date as the Montreal GP! Brilliant!'

As Norris said, CAN AM was first on that date, but to any Quebec FF drivers it was a no brainer where to race after the F1 weekend became known.
The F1 supporting race package was put together rather late, just as all the promotion work, as it was described.
Hopefully CASC learned to move it back to Celebration Weekend.

By allenparkpete:
'Why would it matter that F1 had not been there in two years? Even if they were there last year, surely the ‘rubber’ would be long gone with the four seasons of Montreal taking hold on that race surface.

Or am I wrong about that?

As well, the Nationwide series has been on Il Notre Dame the last two years so it’s not like the track did not see racing yet this was exactly what Brundle inferred and I found his phrasing very peculiar. Any explanations?'

It does not really matter whether one or two race weekends on that track. Unless the race weekends are back to back, them being months apart is like not having any race on it at all, as far as rubbering in is concerned.

The trouble was with the type of asphalt and the type of tire not liking one another. After three hours of practice on Friday and two more hr running on Saturday, it should have rubbered in (unless rain falling overnight). Yet it didn't.

Okay, Adam. I understand your 4th paragraph and had assumed that. Can you elaborate more on the last paragraph? Was it due to the many (4) combinations of tires being used? I asked as Brundle made it out that lack of track use was the fault of the track surface ...and not the tires and cars. I'm going to assume that he means the actual track surface is beat up and dated enough versus all the other tracks on the F1 circus, so that a new asphalt job is in order.

"Rubbering in" is something that drivers can take andvantage of in terms of better grip and performance, but they all have to race on the same track. If the track doesn't rubber in, so what, think of it as a light rain falling throughout the race. It's simply something that the teams and drivers have to contend with and he who contends with with the conditions that prevail the best, wins the race.

Several factors contribute.
Every race weekend at any track, regardless if a track is regularly used (meaning on weekends: as races are almost never run on weekdays, any type of racing), starts with a 'green' surface. As the event progresses towards race day, the track supposed to get rubbered in. This laid down rubber gets washed off by rain and weather. The cycle never stops.

Secondly, the Montreal track has got absolutely no other use, except the other weekend in August for NASCAR. It also regularly gets new asphalt in places, patch jobs here and there. The quality of it always varies.

Thirdly, Bridgestone did not develop bespoke tire for this event. They brought two compounds from the four they manufacture, and that was that. Teams had to cope with what they have got from them.
In the tire war years, tire companies brought Montreal-special tires, just as they developed special tires for the other F1 events.

At Mosport for example, which gets regular use, at the start of the season in May the asphalt is 'green'm the curbs are freshly painted. By August, the curbs are black, the corners are black, have rubbered in. Some always remain in the pockets despite of some rain and sand blowing over. But in May, the process starts from afresh.

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