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04/16/2010

The Impact of Ash

Ash

A car is seen driving through the ash from the volcano eruption under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, April 16, 2010. The volcano erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air. Flights around the world have been canceled and passengers stranded as the ash cloud from the volcano affected operations at some of the world's busiest airports. (AP Photo/Omar Oskarsson)

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A woman reads a newspaper with the headline "Volcano alert" as she waits for the resumption of air travel on April 16, 2010 at the airport in Erfurt, eastern Germany. Air travel was disrupted all over Europe as a high-altitude cloud of volcanic ash from Iceland spread further over Europe.    (JENS-ULRICH KOCH/AFP/Getty Images)

Irlenad1


 Ground staff secure a plastic cover on the engines of an aircraft at Belfast City Airport in Northern Ireland, on April 16, 2010. Thousands more flights were cancelled around the world Friday as a cloud of volcanic ash from Iceland kept airspace across northern Europe closed, inflicting a second day of travel misery on passengers. (PETER MUHLY/AFP/Getty Images)

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Passengers gather in front of flight information screens at Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris, as hundreds of commercial flights across northern Europe are canceled by a drifting plume of volcanic ash originating from Iceland,  April 16, 2010. The Icelandic volcano that erupted Wednesday has sent an enormous cloud of microscopic ash particles across northern Europe, grounding aircraft across the continent. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

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Passengers rest in the departure hall of Copenhagen Airport, April 16, 2010 as the Danish airspace will remains closed until at least 2:00 am (0000 GMT) on April 17, 2010 due to ash from a volcano eruption in Iceland. (NILS MEILVANG/AFP/Getty Images)

Volcanic_disruption_002

Italian tourists rest in the departure hall of Prague's Ruzyne airport on April 16, 2010 as flights were cancelled due to ash from a volcano eruption in Iceland. A huge cloud of volcanic ash from Iceland cast a growing shadow over Europe on Friday, grounding thousands more flights in the continent's biggest air travel shutdown since World War II. (MICHAL CIZEK/AFP/Getty Images)

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A flight information board indicates cancelled flights in a terminal at the Charles-de-Gaulle airport in Roissy, outside Paris, April 16, 2010 due to the ash cloud caused by an Icelandic volcano that turned northern Europe into a no-fly zone.   (REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)

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Passengers stand in a queue to rebook their cancelled flights at the Pablo Ruiz Picasso Airport in Malaga, southern Spain, April 15, 2010. The European air safety organization said the disruption, the biggest seen in the region, could last another two days and a leading volcano expert said the ash could present intermittent problems to air traffic for six months if the eruption continued. REUTERS/Jon Nazca


GErmany3

Stranded passengers soak up the sun in a solarium adjacent to the departures area of the Son Sant Joan Airport in Palma de Mallorca on the island of Mallorca, Spain, April 16, 2010. A huge ash cloud from an Icelandic volcano spread out across Europe on Friday causing air travel chaos on a scale not seen since the September 11 attacks. About 17,000 flights were expected to be cancelled on Friday due to the dangers posed for a second day by volcanic ash from Iceland, aviation officials said. (REUTERS/Enrique Calvo)

Volcanic_disruption_014

A child using a laptop sits on a camp bed, provided by airport operator Fraport, at Frankfurt airport April 16, 2010. Due to a huge ash cloud from an Icelandic volcano, that caused air travel chaos across Europe, passengers in Frankfurt were left stranded and forced to stay overnight.  (REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski)

GERMANY2

Travellers wait at the closed international Airport in Duesseldorf, Germany, April 16, 2010. Most countries in northern Europe suspended their air traffic due to ash clouds from the volcanic eruption in Iceland. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

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People wait for information in the departure hall of Sofia airport on April 16, 2010 as flights were cancelled due to ash from a volcano eruption in Iceland.  Out of a total 91 incoming flights, only nine aircraft from Bucharest, Moscow, Munich, Rome, Tel Aviv and Vienna had landed during the course of the morning.(NIKOLAY DOYCHINOV/AFP/Getty Images)

GERMANY1

 

Volcanic_disruption_011

Passengers crowd the platform as a train arrives in Hamburg, Germany, April 16, 2010. Many travellers are trying to take the train as alternative for their cancelled flights. Flights at Frankfurt airport, the biggest in Germany, were halted indefinitely as a high-altitude cloud of volcanic ash from Iceland spread further over Europe. (PHILIPP GUELLAND/AFP/Getty Images)

Volcanic_disruption_004

Passengers wait in the departure hall at the Vienna airport April 16, 2010, after a huge ash cloud from an
Icelandic volcano spread out across Europe causing air travel chaos on a scale not seen since the September 11 attacks. About 17,000 flights were expected to be cancelled on Friday due to the dangers posed for a second day by volcanic ash from Iceland. (REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader)

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A Finnair aircraft is grounded at Helsinki-Vantaa Airport in Vantaa on April 16, 2010. Finland grounded all flights due to ash from an Icelandic volcano eruption, and will not permit any commercial flights until until 3:00 pm (1200 GMT) on April 18 at the earliest. (ANTTI AIMO-KOIVISTO/AFP/Getty Images)

Volcanic_disruption_009

A passenger sleeps as she waits for the resumption of air travel in Frankfurt, Germany.  Flights at Frankfurt airport, the biggest in Germany, were halted indefinitely as a high-altitude cloud of volcanic ash from Iceland spread further over Europe.  (TORSTEN SILZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Vol_blue

A plume of volcanic ash rises into the atmosphere from a crater under about 656 feet (200 metres) of ice at the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in southern Iceland. A huge ash cloud from the Icelandic volcano turned the skies of northern Europe into a no-fly zone on Thursday, stranding hundreds of thousands of passengers. Picture taken April 14, 2010.  REUTERS/Olafur Eggertsson 

Plume

This picture taken March 27, 2010 shows lava spurting out of the site of a volcanic eruption at the Fimmvorduhals volcano near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier some 125 Kms east of Reykjakik.  With lava still gushing, a small Icelandic volcano that initially sent hundreds fleeing from their homes is turning into a boon for the island nation's tourism industry, as visitors flock to catch a glimpse of the eruption. (HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP/Getty Images)

Sparks

Lava spews out of a volcano in the region of the Eyjafjallajoekull glacier in southern Iceland, on March 21, 2010.  The small volcano eruption that forced more than 600 people to flee their homes in Iceland over the weekend could conceivably set off a larger volcano, experts warned.    (Fior Kjartansson/AFP/Getty Images)

 Cloud_white


An aerial handout photo from the Icelandic Coast Guard shows a plume of steam rising 22,000 feet (6700 meters) from a crater under about 656 feet (200 metres) of ice at the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in southern Iceland. REUTERS/Icelandic Coast Guard/Arni Saeberg/Handout  

Cloud_black

A plume of volcanic ash rises six to 11 kilometres into the atmosphere, from a crater under about 200 metres of ice at the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in southern Iceland April 14, 2010. REUTERS/Jon Gustafsson

ICELAND-VOLCANO-METEOSAT

A Meteosat photo shows a dark cloud of volcanic ash spreading over Iceland. A volcanic eruption in Iceland fired ash across northern Europe forcing the closure of huge swathes of international airspace on Thursday which grounded hundreds of flights.  The eruption of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in southeast Iceland had already melted part of a surrounded glacier causing severe floods. (April 15, 2010) (HANDOUT/AFP/Getty Images)

Pink

 

Tourists gather to watch lava spurt out of the site of a volcanic eruption at the Fimmvorduhals volcano near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier some 125 Kms east of Reykjakik on March 27, 2010.   Up to 800 people were evacuated in Iceland early on April 14, 2010 due to the volcanic eruption under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in the south of the island, police and geophysicists said. (HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP/Getty Images)

Valley

An aerial handout photo from the Icelandic Coast Guard shows flood caused by a volcanic eruption at Eyjafjalla Glacier in southern Iceland April 14, 2010. The volcanic eruption on Wednesday partially melted a glacier, setting off a major flood that threatened to damage roads and bridges and forcing hundreds to evacuate from a thinly populated area.  (REUTERS/Icelandic Coast Guard/Arni Saeberg)

Road

This April 14, 2010 image taken by the Icelandic Coastguard, shows floodwaters rising after the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet. Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding. (AP Photo/Icelandic Coastguard)

Sat_2

This NASA handout photo released on April 15, 2010 shows an image captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite of a natural-color image. A volcanic plume blows from Eyjafjallajˆkull Volcano in southern Iceland toward the east-southeast. The plume blows past the Faroe Islands and arcs slightly toward the north near the Shetland Islands. The plume’s tan hue indicates a fairly high ash content. Eyjafjallajˆkull (or Eyjafjˆll) is a stratovolcano composed of alternating layers of ash, lava, and rocks ejected by earlier eruptions. The huge cloud of ash from an Icelandic volcano drifted over northern Europe on Thursday, forcing the closure of vast swathes of international airspace and the cancellation of hundreds of flights. HO/AFP/Getty Images

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Inbound flight cancellations at Manchester airport are posted beside a notice of explanation that the disruptions are due to volcanic ash from Iceland. All London flights, including those from Heathrow, are suspended from 1100 GMT Thursday due to volcanic ash from Iceland that has already caused almost 300 cancellations, officials said. (ANDREW YATES/AFP/Getty Images)

Forehead

A passenger gestures as other passengers wait in check-in queues following the cancellation of flights, at Faro airport in Portugal April 15, 2010.  Dozens of flights from Faro airport on the Portuguese tourist resort province of Algarve to northern Europe were cancelled due to a volcanic eruption in Iceland, which has thrown up a 6 km (3.7 mile) high cloud of ash and disrupted air traffic in northern Europe. (REUTERS/Carlos Brito)

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Airline passengers sit on the floor while awaiting information about flight cancellations in Terminal 5 at Heathrow Airport, west of  London on April 15, 2010. No flights will be allowed into British airspace from 1100 GMT until at least 1700 GMT Thursday due to an ash cloud from a volcanic eruption in Iceland, air traffic control services announced. (ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Bluenight
 
A glow appears on the skyline on March 21, 2010 in the region of the Eyjafjallajoekull glacier in Iceland. A volcano in the area of the Eyjafallajoekull glacier in southern Iceland erupted early Sunday, forcing more than 500 people in its vicinity to evacuate their homes.  (HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP/Getty Images)

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gorgeous pictures.

amazing photos. better than boston's big picture somehow!

The pictures are fantastic! The aerial and satellite photos really give a global scope while the pictures of the travellers give the problem personality and sense of the emotions it evokes. Thank you!

This is amazing photo journalism. A picture is truly 1000 words!

Government from each country where passengers are affected should do some arragements for them. showers, food, sleeping etc.

Gaya's revenge just beggining!

the power of nature brings mankind to a grinding halt!

These are amazing photos that illustrate the extent of the volcano and it's effects on the world, thanks for making them available online for no charge,
Mark

This is the will of God! 100% If the wind was blowing the other way the problem would be here in Canada

Awesome photos. The immediacy of the impact on the faces of the stranded passengers really comes through. The photos of Iceland itself look so surreal, so beautiful, almost like paintings from the Old Masters like Rembrandt and Da Vinci. Superb job!

Oh my goodness! What madness. I can only imagine how upset the passengers must have been upon hearing the terrible news. And what stunning photos you have! Thank you so much for sharing this post, it was really interesting.

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