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04/19/2010

Volcano's ash blankets part of Iceland and continues to hamper journeys home

Force of Nature_015

Lightning streaks across the sky as lava flows from a volcano in Eyjafjallajokul, April 17, 2010. An Icelandic volcano that is spewing ash into the air and wreaking havoc on flights across Europe appeared to be easing up on Saturday but could continue to erupt for days or even months to come. (REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

Force of Nature_001

A National Geographic film crew set-up on southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier after landing on the glacier, close to the volcanic eruption, April 18, 2010.  Scientists say that because the volcano is situated below the glacial ice cap, magma is being cooled quickly, causing explosions and plumes of grit.  The eruption is ongoing and forecasters have predicted that light prevailing winds in Europe mean that the situation for air travel is unlikely to change in the coming days. (AP Photo/Reynir Petursson)

Force of Nature_009

A plume of ash from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier covers the farm of Pall Eggert Olafsson, in Thorvaldseyri, Iceland,  April 19, 2010. Meteorologists in Iceland said eruptions from the volcano were weakening and the ash was no longer rising to a height where it would endanger large commercial aircraft. (AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti)

ICELAND-VOLCANO(2)

A cloud of black ash looms above horses at Drangshlid 2 in Eyjafjoll, April 17, 2010. An Icelandic volcano that is spewing ash into the air and wreaking havoc on flights across Europe appeared to be easing up on Saturday but could continue to erupt for days or even months to come. (REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson)

Force of Nature_012

A motorist takes pictures as the Eyjafjallajokull volcano continues to billow smoke and ash during an eruption on April 17, 2010. Winds blowing a massive volcanic ash cloud from Iceland could keep lashing Europe until the middle of next week, experts said Saturday, amid hints that the eruption could soon start tapering off.  Millions of people faced worsening travel chaos Sunday as a volcanic ash cloud from Iceland moved further south and east, forcing European countries to extend flight bans into next week.   (HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP/Getty Images)

Force of Nature_014

Sheep farmer Thorkell Eiriksson, and his brother-in-law Petur Runottsson, work to seal a sheep barn, in case winds shift and volcanic ash from a volcano erupting across the valley lands on their farm, in Eyjafjallajokull, April 17, 2010.  The current season is when the spring lambs are born and such young animals are especially susceptible to volcanic ash in their lungs so they must be stored inside. (REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

Force of Nature_011

A man runs at the roadside to take pictures of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano as it continues to billow smoke and ash during an eruption on April 17, 2010. Millions of people faced worsening travel chaos Sunday as a volcanic ash cloud from Iceland moved further south and east, forcing European countries to extend flight bans into next week. (HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP/Getty Images)

Force of Nature_008

A departure board at Athens international airport is pictured through a metal advertising placard on April 19, 2010. More than 100 destinations from Athens were canceled due to the Icelandic volcanic ash cloud which covered large parts of Europe for the past four days. Iceland's Eyjafjoell volcano has started spewing out less ash, a sign the eruption could be tapering off and that Europe's air traffic nightmare could be coming to an end, experts said today. (ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Force of Nature_019

Stranded passengers take a nap in the departures area of Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok, April 18, 2010. Dozens of Asian flights to Europe were cancelled for a third day as regional airlines warn of a week of chaos caused by freak volcanic ash, which has stranded thousands of travellers and caused heavy economic losses.   (ROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Force of Nature_004

Passengers buses traveling from Calais, France, to the United Kingdom board at car ferry terminal, April 19, 2010. Many European countries suspended their air traffic due to ash clouds from the volcanic eruption in Iceland, forcing travellers to find alernate ways of getting home. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

GERMANY(2)

Stranded passengers queue for train tickets at Munich's international airport, April 19, 2010. Large parts of Europe enforced no-fly rulings for a fifth day on Monday because of a huge ash cloud from an Icelandic volcano that has caused the worst air travel chaos since the September 11 attacks.   (REUTERS/Michael Dalder)

Force of Nature_017

Passengers wait to buy tickets at Termini central train station in Rome, April 18, 2010. Air traffic remained seriously disrupted across Europe as a cloud of ash released from Iceland's volcanic eruption forced many countries to close their airspace.  (ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty Images)

Force of Nature_007

A stranded passenger sleeps in the transit area in Frankfurt's airport, April 19, 2010. German airports remain closed due to the ash cloud caused by an Icelandic volcano that turned northern Europe into a no-fly zone. (REUTERS/Johannes Eisele)

Force of Nature_003

The HMS Ark Royal leaves Portsmouth, England on April 6, 2010. The Ark Royal is one the Royal Navy warships to be sent on Monday to rescue those stranded across the Channel by the volcanic ash cloud and the aviation industry blasted European officials, claiming there was "no coordination and no leadership" in the crisis that shut down most European airports for a fifth day. (AP Photo/Royal Navy/HANDOUT) 

Force of Nature_018

Frank Berg of Bad Hersfeld, Germany gives the thumbs up outside of car rental offices at Vasagatan in central Stockholm, April 18, 2010, after arranging to share a rental car with friends from Turkey and Denmark, in order to take them home.  EU transport ministers are expected to hold a special video conference Monday on the air travel crisis caused by the volcanic ash cloud from Iceland, the Spanish EU presidency said today.  (TOMAS ONEBORG/AFP/Getty Images)

Force of Nature_002

Accompanied by a British Border Agency boat, some of the stranded travellers evacuated from Calais, France, enter the Dover marina on England's south east coast, April 18, 2010. TV presenter Dan Snow launched a mission to ferry passengers across the Channel in a fleet of Rigid Inflatable Boats, after they were left stranded by flight cancellations following a volcano eruption in Iceland. Snow had hatched the plan with a friend, Sam Peters, after his wife Debs became stranded following the disruption caused by the volcanic ash cloud drifting over Britain. The pair were using boats borrowed from a Dover yachting firm and had appealed for people who urgently needed to get back to the UK to make contact with them on Twitter. But a tweet this afternoon informed followers the mission had been aborted and apologised to those whose hopes of returning with the flotilla had been dashed. The posting read: "We have been shut down! No reason. Rescued 25 on way home shortly. No more boats we are very sorry." (AP Photo/PA, Max Nash)

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wow! the power of nature, this shows how hopeless we are despite the our technology! amazing images!

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