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07/13/2011

Editor's Choice - Pictures of the Day - The Milky Way - July 13, 2011

An Australian astronomer spent 18 months photographing the night sky with an ordinary digital camera, turning thousands of pictures into a stunning time-lapse video. 

PHOTOS; ALEX CHERNEY/BNPS

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This image shows star trails above Elephant Rock on the Mornington Peninsula in South Victoria.


Alex Cherney took advantage of the lack of light pollution from a remote peninsula on the south coast of Australia to record the dazzling scenes, showing how the sky changes at night.

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The pictures show planets, shooting stars, the Milky Way, the Moon, satellites and planes as well as rolling clouds, changing tides and passing ships on the horizon.

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Cherney, an IT consultant, spent six separate nights over 18 months shooting the sky — each with a new or crescent moon to ensure minimum interference from light.

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His spectacular images were then edited into a two-and-a-half minute video.

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“It was my daughter who got me into astronomy,” the 36-year-old father-of-two from Melbourne told the Daily Mail. “She came home from school with a project and asked if we could find aliens, so we went along to a local astronomy club.

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“So much of our sky is disappearing due to excessive light pollution. Most people in developed countries wouldn’t see anything like this when they look up.”

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“In Australia we’re fortunate in that we don’t have to go far to get away from the city lights, and I hope my pictures will help other people realize what’s really out there. For this, I went out whenever there was a new moon and good weather — six nights over the course of 18 months.

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An amazing photo taken from the southern tip of Australia shows a meteorite near the Milky Way.



“I set my camera up to take a sequence of pictures, with each exposure of 30 seconds. I took around 1,000 pictures a night, and then I put them together to demonstrate how the sky moves in relation to our position on Earth.”

Comments

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for the guy from canada please get off the subway I was two hours north of Toronto on the weekend at a dharma the milky way was spectacular for both nights we were there it is not on the horizon in canada like say mexico chile australia etc it is overhead ... i have also seen spectacular northern lights in saskatchewan and meteorite showers all over the west and all over ontario I hope you are not in the PR biz or communications of ANY KIND LOOK UP ....

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